Translation gone wrong!

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Translation gone wrong!

http://truecom.com/index.php/component/content/37-producten/home/48-contact/component/content/oplossingen/oplossingen/over-ons/draadloos/draadloos/home/48-contact/partners Machines may one day rise and take over the world, but judging by some of the phrases Google Translate spits out, we don’t have anything to worry about for quite some time. Even with Google’s massive computing power, translating to and from Chinese can produce some pretty comical results.

http://shellystearooms.com/sv/shellys-tea-rooms-news-autumn-2015/ Australian Prime Minister Julia Gillard learned this the hard way recently when her office released an official Chinese translation of her report “Australia in the Asian Century” that was barely comprehensible. Littered with grammar mistakes, poor word choices and other issues. Critics claim the translation appeared to rely heavily on Google Translate, though the PM’s office insists the work was outsourced to a certified translation service. The PM’s Office and the translation service are working together to sort out exactly what happened.

The complexities and unique characteristics of Mandarin make computerized translation extremely challenging. Chinese has developed over thousands of years, individual characters often have a complex history and significant cultural meaning that is difficult for a machine to capture. As if that wasn’t challenging enough, Chinese Netizens are constantly inventing new terms.

Word choice and grammar is already more than Google Translate can cope with, but there are significant cultural differences that can’t be ignored. English is littered with slang and sports metaphors that simply make no sense to native Chinese. This intimate knowledge of language and culture is nearly impossible to program into a computer, but is second nature to a good human translator.

Businesses determined to have an impact in the Chinese market must deliver a clear understandable message to potential customers. A company website may be a Chinese consumers first encounter with the business, and as we all know, first impressions are critical. Relying on a computer to translate such a vital message and experience is a strategy doomed to fail. Only human translators are able to tap the wealth of cultural knowledge and language quirks that ensure your message gets delivered.

Christopher Billman

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